Pests/Insects: Aphids, Borers & Beatles, Scale

State Licensed: #714671 Family Owned and Operated Same Day and 24 Hour Emergency Service Arborist Corner Pests/Insects: Aphids, Borers & Beatles, Scale Bugs in your trees? Some insects are beneficial but others will destroy the beauty of your landscape if you don’t care for your trees properly. It is important to distinguish the good bugs from the bad ones. Here the Natural Arbor Care arborist lists some common pests that can attack your trees and shrubs: Aphids: This pest can occur in large numbers on new shoots in the rainy season. Aphids suck sap from young shoots and cause damage to these developing shoots. You will often see large numbers of small black aphids (2 to 3 mm long) concentrated on new growth, often associated with black, sooty mold. Azalea Lace Bugs With wings that look like they are made of lace, azalea lace bugs might seem harmless. In large populations, azalea lace bugs, which stick to the undersides of the leaves and suck the “green” out of the leaf, can weaken azaleas and rhododendrons. But with some extra care and attention, you can help save your plants from unsightly leaf damage. Beetles – These insects are known for having two sets of wings—the top wing is like a hard shell that protects the second set of wings. Beetles make up 40 % of described insect species. Some beetles are beneficial like lady bugs or lady beetles. Others do damage to shrubs and trees. A good description of tree damaging beetles is located in this Home Guide about Tree Killing Beetles by Mollie Allman. Boxelder Bug – This is a...

Fungus and Diseases of Trees, Part 2

State Licensed: #714671 Family Owned and Operated Same Day and 24 Hour Emergency Service Arborist Corner Fungus and Diseases of Trees, Part 2 In Part 1 of Fungus and Diseases of Trees, Natural Arbor Care’s certified arborist listed some common problems that he sees in trees. Today he will discuss certain fungus and diseases that attack oaks in the fall and winter months. This year has been a very dry winter season. These diseases often take hold during cold and rainy weather: Hyproxylon Canker of Oak – This fungal canker attacks weakened trees through wounds and grows in the sapwood. The red-black oak group is more susceptible than the white oak group. Infected branches die back. Dead sunken patches of bark peel off exposing a silvery layer of fungus. Oak Wilt – This disease spread is by root grafts, insects and occasionally squirrels. Leaves develop chlorotic (yellow) veins that eventually turn necrotic (brown and dead). Defoliation may be rapid. The tree canopy becomes thin and no new leaves emerge. Symptoms appear in spring or summer. Peeled bark or a cut branch from an infected tree may show a brown or black discoloration in the outer annual sapwood ring. Sudden Oak Death – a type of water mold, Phytophthora ramorum, is the cause of Sudden Oak Death (SOD). This refers to the apparent rapid decline of the entire tree crown. The leaves often turn from a healthy green color to brown in only a few weeks. It may take several months or years for the mold to kill a tree. Three species of native California oaks (Quercus spp.) and a...

Funguses and Diseases of Trees, Part 1

State Licensed: #714671 Family Owned and Operated Same Day and 24 Hour Emergency Service Arborist Corner Funguses and Diseases of Trees, Part 1 Tree fungus and diseases can be very serious to the health of your trees and shrubs or only an unsightly nuisance. In this article, our certified arborist lists some common ones that may affect your trees. Armillaria Root Disease – A fungus that attacks tree roots. It can attack trees that have already been weakened by other factors or attack healthy trees that then become susceptible to other fungi and insects. It can affect conifers and oak trees. It is called oak tree fungus when it appears in oak tree roots. Ash leaf Rust – Ash leaf rust can be a significant problem in the Mid-Atlantic area and along the New England coast. Leaves, petioles and green twigs become infected during May and June. Anthracnose – This is a group of fungal diseases that affect trees and plants in warm, humid environments. Symptoms: Twig dieback – yellowing and blight of affected leaves. Twigs wilt, defoliate and die at the tips. Maple, oak, ash and sycamore trees are especially susceptible. Aspen Canker – There are a number of types of fungi that can infect aspen trees and cause aspen canker. Canker diseases cause sunken oval areas on the bark in the early stages. Late stage aspen canker causes areas of crumbling bark. The sooner your tree disease treatment provider starts treating aspen canker, the better the chances of saving the affected trees. Crown Rot – Crown rot is a disease caused by soil-borne fungus. It typically affects garden...

Tree Risk Checklist

State Licensed: #714671 Family Owned and Operated Same Day and 24 Hour Emergency Service Arborist Corner Tree Risk Checklist Trees provide us with shade, food, beauty and add value to our homes and public places. But, if a tree is injured or damaged it can be a safety risk to people or property. Homeowners should inspect the trees on their property several times a year for signs of problems. But, are you wondering what to look for? Here is a checklist of warning signs that your trees need a professional’s care from the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) website: Are there large, dead branches in the tree? Are there detached branches hanging in the tree? Does the tree have cavities or rotten wood along the trunk or in major branches? Are mushrooms present at the base of the tree? Are there cracks or splits in the trunk or where branches are attached? Have any branches fallen from the tree? Have adjacent trees fallen over or died? Has the trunk developed a strong lean? Do many of the major branches arise from one point on the trunk? Have the roots been broken off, injured, or damaged by lowering the soil level, installing pavement, repairing sidewalks, or digging trenches? Has the site recently been changed by construction, raising the soil level, or installing lawns? Have the leaves prematurely developed an unusual color or size? Have trees in adjacent wooded areas been removed? Has the tree been topped or otherwise heavily pruned? To get a copy of the complete two page handout from ISA, go to treesaregood.com http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/resources/TreeRisk.pdf Are your trees at...

9 Critical Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Tree Service Company

State Licensed: #714671 Family Owned and Operated Same Day and 24 Hour Emergency Service Arborist Corner 9 Critical Questions to Ask Before Hiring a Tree Service Company Before you make a decision to entrust your beautiful trees and shrubs to any company, make sure to ask these questions about your tree service company: 1. Do they have specific training in tree care? An ISA Certified Arborist has passed a certification exam demonstrating knowledge in all aspects of tree care and has specific training and experience in arboriculture. A tree service with just a landscaper’s license may not have specific training or experience in caring for trees. 2. Do they have the proper safety equipment? Staff should be using safety glasses, ear protection, hard hats, and chain saw protection. Worker safety is very important to a professional company. 3. Are the teams trained to work together safely? Taking down a tall tree safely requires team work, training and discipline. Are the tree climbers certified? Certified tree climbers have passed an exam on the proper ways to care for your trees safely. Ask what safety training the staff receive. 4. Will they give you a written estimate and contract for work? Getting your estimate and contract for work in writing is the only way to assure that you know what the job will actually cost and what is covered or not covered. It is a good idea to get more than one estimate. Beware of an estimate that is a lot lower than others. It may not be such a great deal when you look closely. 5. Are they insured? The...